Commands

killall Command in Linux Explained

killall Command in Linux | Explained

The killall command in Linux is used to kill multiple processes. It can kill the processes by their names and groups. killall command works with signals also

iostat command in linux

iostat Command in Linux | Explained

The iostat command in Linux displays the system’s resources being used. It can display the CPU or device/disk usage, resource usage report in real time.

Wall command in Linux Explained

wall Command in Linux | Explained

The wall command in Linux allows the users to send broadcast messages to all the connected users or the group of users. Here wall command in Linux is discussed.

rm rf Linux Command Explained

rm -rf Linux Command | Explained

The “rm -rf” command in Linux is the combination of “-r” and the “-f” options that deletes the specified directory “recursively” and “forcefully”.

ls-ltr Command in Linux Explained

ls-ltr Command in Linux | Explained

The “ls -ltr” lists the content of the specified directory in a (-l)long list format (-r)reversely which is sorted by its last modification date and time(-t).

Whereis Command in Linux Explained

whereis Command in Linux | Explained

Linux offers a pre-installed “whereis” command that retrieves the location of the binary, source code, and manual page files of the specified command.

splitt command

split Command in Linux | Explained

The split is a Linux command line utility of Linux considered for breaking down large files into multiple small-size files. See the guide for more explanation.

ss command

ss Command in Linux | Explained

The ss (Sockets Statistics) is the replacement of the netstat command, helpful for troubleshooting or resolving network-related issues.

How to Use Who Command in Linux

who Command in Linux | Explained

In Linux, the “who” is the pre-installed command line utility that provides currently logged-in users along with their additional login information.

Finger command tutorial

finger command in Linux | Explained

In Linux, the “finger” command gives the logged-in user information such as login name, time, real name, idle time, terminal type, office, and phone number.

make Command in Linux

make Command in Linux | Explained

The make command allows the users to compile project source files. For compiling the source code, the set of instructions is defined in the “makefile” file.

dig Command in Linux Explained

dig Command in Linux | Explained

The dig command is the popular command-line utility for networking administrators to obtain DNS-related information for domain names.

How to echo Shell Commands

How to echo Shell Commands?

Linux bash scripting uses the “set -x” and “set -v” commands to echo the defined set of shell commands placed in it at any point.

What is $PWD in Linux

What is $PWD in Linux?

The “$PWD” is an environment variable that contains the absolute path of the current working directory starting from the “root(\)” directory.

arping Command on Linux Explained

arping Command on Linux | Explained

In Linux, the “arping” command sends ARP requests to the host by specifying the IP address and verifying the availability of hosts on a network.

lftp Command in Linux

lftp Command in Linux

The “lftp” command transfers or manages files in a remote machine by making a connection over protocols including UDP, HTTP, FTP, and many more.

How to Follow Redirects Using curl

How to Follow Redirects Using curl?

To follow the redirect to the URL, execute the “curl -L ” command. Before it, users must ensure that the “curl” command is installed in the system.

how Does find -name work

How Does find -name Work?

The “find -name” locates the files/directories by different parameters name, extensions, or searching and deleting the particular file/directory.

How to Run the getent Command in Linux

How to Run the getent Command in Linux?

To run the getent command in Linux, follow the general syntax “getent [Options] [Database] [Key]”. It finds the information from the computer’s databases.

Use ldd Command in Linux

How to Use ldd Command in Linux?

The “ldd” command stands for “List Down Dependencies”, which is used to display executable files or program-shared library dependencies.

How to chown Recursively on Linux

How to chown Recursively on Linux?

To use chown recursively, use the “R” flag with the command’s syntax. You can change the user, groups, and both (users and groups) in one command.

Linux cmp Command Examples

Linux cmp Command Examples

Uncover the power of Linux’s “cmp” command. Compare files & verify integrity with ease. Learn basic usage, benefits, and scenarios to improve efficiency.

How to Use Linux Journalctl Command

How to Use Linux Journalctl Command?

Unlock the power of Linux logs with our guide on mastering the journalctl command. Learn to manage and diagnose system issues in no time efficiently.

ethtool Commands and Examples

ethtool Commands and Examples

Linux and most of its distributions support the network command line utility “ethtool” to display and manage the network interface devices.

Commands to Clear Linux Terminal

Commands to Clear Linux Terminal

Linux offers the “reset”, “clear”, and “printf” commands to clear the terminal screen. The user can also use the “Ctrl+L” shortcut key to perform this task.

xxd Command in Linux with Examples

xxd Command in Linux with Examples

The xxd command can convert text into hexadecimal text, binary and reverse the hexadecimal to normal text as explained in this guide with different examples.

TCPDUMP Beginner Guide

TCPDUMP Beginner Guide

The important uses of the tcpdump command are explained, which can be very helpful for beginners to monitor the network communication with the tcpdump command.

List of GDB Commands and What They Do

List of GDB Commands and What They Do

GNU Debugger (GDB) acts as a compiler for various languages, i.e., C, and C++. Read out this post to get the list of GDB commands and their usage with examples.

Linux who, w and whoami Command

Linux who, w, and whoami Commands

The “who”, “w”, and “whoami” are the utilities for displaying the last boot, activities or average load, and currently logged-in user.

View the Content of a Tar File

How to View the Content of a Tar File?

Linux offers the “tar” command with the “tvf” option to view the contents of a tar file. It displays the “file names”, “date and time”, and “file location”.